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'Flexitime' school that rewrites the book on teaching - Education News, Education - The Independent

smarterplanet:

Welcome to the world of flexitime schooling which will see a child in Spain educated through Skype from the UK and a mother who splits her son’s education between home teaching and school. Hollinsclough Church of England primary school in Staffordshire is the first in the UK to introduce a part-time policy for pupils.

[…]

Now she has 11 full-time pupils, 10 part-timers and as many as 15 to 20 families coming in to join the school’s learning “hub” – which arranges events such as simulations of archaeological digs and arts activities for children.
The school’s motto is to provide what the parents want for their children, said Mrs Mountford-Lees. “I recently asked them what they would most like and some of them said for their children to learn Latin.” She is now trying to arrange for a private tutor to come in and provide the classes.

(via @per_infontology)

This is a really interesting concept which starts to break down some of the traditional views of what a school is.

To me the important part is that this model was made possible by slack in the system. One key part was a school and a teacher with too few pupils, the other key part was home schooled children who searched for a part time teachers with a certain skill or knowledge.

In the civilized world schools and school systems are almost always so optimized and efficient (read “stuffed”) that there are neither time nor space to be innovative. If innovation needs something it is white space to innovate in, and that is true in the educational system as well.

via futuramb:

hmhbooks:

A new book from the Nobel Prize winner Gunter Grass, The Box, explores the complicated yet precise contours of memory and what we learn when called upon to relive our experiences.   “Once  upon a time there was a father who, because he had grown old, called  together his sons and daughters—four, five, six, eight in number—and  finally convinced them, after long hesitation, to do as he wished. Now  they are sitting around a table and begin to talk . . .”
In  an audacious literary experiment, Günter Grass writes in the voices of  his eight children as they record memories of their childhoods, of  growing up, of their father, who was always at work on a new book,  always at the margins of their lives. Memories contradictory, critical,  loving, accusatory—they piece together an intimate picture of this most  public of men. To say nothing of Marie, Grass’s assistant, a family  friend of many years, perhaps even a lover, whose snapshots taken with  an old-fashioned Agfa box camera provide the author with ideas for his  work. But her images offer much more. They reveal a truth beyond the  ordinary detail of life, depict the future, tell what might have been,  grant the wishes in visual form of those photographed. The children  speculate on the nature of this magic: was the enchanted camera a source  of inspiration for their father? Did it represent the power of art  itself? Was it the eye of God?
Recalling J. M. Coetzee’s Summertime and Umberto Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, The Box is an inspired and daring work of fiction. In its candor, wit, and earthiness, it is Grass at his best.
 ”It  may not be a memoir, but it is an exercise in soul-searching…this is a  novel of great humility, questioning whether the measure of a life  really is a life’s work… [Grass] shows a remarkable willingness to  kick a hole in the usual self-importance of a prize-winning author.”-The New York Times Book Review

hmhbooks:

A new book from the Nobel Prize winner Gunter Grass, The Box, explores the complicated yet precise contours of memory and what we learn when called upon to relive our experiences.  

“Once upon a time there was a father who, because he had grown old, called together his sons and daughters—four, five, six, eight in number—and finally convinced them, after long hesitation, to do as he wished. Now they are sitting around a table and begin to talk . . .”

In an audacious literary experiment, Günter Grass writes in the voices of his eight children as they record memories of their childhoods, of growing up, of their father, who was always at work on a new book, always at the margins of their lives. Memories contradictory, critical, loving, accusatory—they piece together an intimate picture of this most public of men. To say nothing of Marie, Grass’s assistant, a family friend of many years, perhaps even a lover, whose snapshots taken with an old-fashioned Agfa box camera provide the author with ideas for his work. But her images offer much more. They reveal a truth beyond the ordinary detail of life, depict the future, tell what might have been, grant the wishes in visual form of those photographed. The children speculate on the nature of this magic: was the enchanted camera a source of inspiration for their father? Did it represent the power of art itself? Was it the eye of God?

Recalling J. M. Coetzee’s Summertime and Umberto Eco’s The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana, The Box is an inspired and daring work of fiction. In its candor, wit, and earthiness, it is Grass at his best.

 ”It may not be a memoir, but it is an exercise in soul-searching…this is a novel of great humility, questioning whether the measure of a life really is a life’s work… [Grass] shows a remarkable willingness to kick a hole in the usual self-importance of a prize-winning author.”
-The New York Times Book Review

(via hmhlit)

nationaljournal:

PHOTO OF THE DAY: President Obama signs a book of condolences at the Norwegian Ambassador’s residence in Washington on Tuesday. Obama visited the residence to personally offer his condolences after twin attacks in Norway on Friday. (PHOTO: JIM WATSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

nationaljournal:

PHOTO OF THE DAY: President Obama signs a book of condolences at the Norwegian Ambassador’s residence in Washington on Tuesday. Obama visited the residence to personally offer his condolences after twin attacks in Norway on Friday. (PHOTO: JIM WATSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

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"“What if we really started taking this seriously—for everyone? Do I hear music?”
These are the last lines of No More Nice Girls, which is not so much a book as an event, a rock tossed in the stream of daily existence that alters its current forever. (Hence the impulse among readers to frame their responses as autobiographies: do religious converts review their revelations?)”"

Emily Books: The Courage of Someone Else’s Convictions by Elizabeth Gumport

  (via thingsiatethatilove)

(via emilygould)

doctorswithoutborders:

The book Medical Innovations in Humanitarian Situations explores how the particular style of humanitarian action practiced by MSF has stayed in line with the standards in scientifically advanced countries while also leading to significant improvements in the medical care delivered to people in crisis.
Through a series of case studies, the authors reflect on how medical aid workers dealt with the incongruity of practicing conventional evidence-based medicine in contexts that require unconventional approaches.
You can purchase the book on Amazon for about $6,  download a PDF of it for free, or read it online.

doctorswithoutborders:

The book Medical Innovations in Humanitarian Situations explores how the particular style of humanitarian action practiced by MSF has stayed in line with the standards in scientifically advanced countries while also leading to significant improvements in the medical care delivered to people in crisis.

Through a series of case studies, the authors reflect on how medical aid workers dealt with the incongruity of practicing conventional evidence-based medicine in contexts that require unconventional approaches.

You can purchase the book on Amazon for about $6, download a PDF of it for free, or read it online.

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irisblasi:

This may be my favorite book title ever.

irisblasi:

This may be my favorite book title ever.

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comicbookdeviant:

Green Lantern // Art by Stanley Lau

(Source: mainstreamcomics)

homedesigning:

Book clock! You can buy it here.

homedesigning:

Book clock! You can buy it here.

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Filipino Reader Conference: ReaderCon Filipino Friday: Week 4

filipinoreadercon:

12 days to the ReaderCon, and we hope everyone’s looking forward to attending! By the middle of next week, we’ll be announcing the mechanics for the online raffles. However, today, we’re up for another Filipino Friday post!

We hope you’ve taken the chance to go around and have a…

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A Library's Approach to Books That Offend

In general, librarians are trained to tackle any complaints about books with a polite demeanor. But they are also instructed to stand firm in defending the book’s presence in the library.

On the rare occasions when a formal objection is upheld by library officials, a book may be removed or put in a less accessible area; that way, the challenged item remains in the library’s collection, although it is harder to find.

(Source: nocureforcuriosity)